Visit to the Doge’s Palace and the Marciana Library

Posted on: April 20th, 2017 by intern No Comments

Friday, April 28, 2017

Meeting point: 9.20 am San Zaccaria boat stop (boat line n°20)

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The visit is compulsory for students enrolled in the courses:
Prof. Pes’course S1701 History of Venice
Prof. Perilli’s course S1707 Art and Architecture in Renaissance Venice

All costs are sponsored by VIU for students of the above mentioned courses

Program
- 9.30 am: Meeting with local guide, Caterina Nardin, for the visit to the Doge’s Palace
- 10.30 am: Estimated time for the end of the visit
- 11 am: Visit to the Marciana Library

 

Some History

The Doge’s Palace is an impressive structure composed of layers of building elements and ornamentation, from its 14th and 15th century original foundations to the significant Renaissance and Mannerist adjunctions. Originally an agglomeration of different buildings destined to serve various purposes, many fires destroyed it through the centuries, leading to constant renovations. It housed not only the Doge’s apartments, the seat of the government and the city’s courtrooms, but also a jail, and in the second half of the 16th century new prisons were built, linked to the Doge’s Palace by the Bridge of Sighs. When the Republic fell in 1797, its role as the heart of political life inevitably changed and it was occupied by various administrative offices, housing important cultural institutions such as the Biblioteca Marciana (from 1811 to 1904). In 1923, the Italian State, owner of the building, appointed the City Council to manage it as a public museum.

The Marciana Library was the result of a long history regarding the building of a public library in Venice. In 1362 Francesco Petrarca decided to donate his books to the Venetian Republic as a starting point for book lovers. In 1560 the St. Mark’s Library opened and started growing as more and more works were donated to the municipality and also thanks to a 1603 Venetian law that led all the printers to deposit a copy of every publication.

 

 

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